Jack Saturday

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1717-1719

“Anti-careerism” refers to a negative stance, a rejection of a certain way of thinking. In this rejection, however, lies an enormous potential to explore ways of life beyond the 9-to-5 grind, to find paths to happiness, fulfillment, and well-being outside the cycle of working, earning, and spending, and to strive for self-development without regard for employability, marketability, and economic productivity. It can free us to become less competitive and less materialistic, and to lead lives of greater leisure and less stress. It opens us to focus on questions like “What can I do for the world?” or “How can I become the best person I can be?” rather than “What can I do that people will pay me to do?”
Interview: Kate McFarland On Anti-Careerism
December 3, 2017 Jennifer Lawson




Almost beyond belief, he draws three trees and perchance the hint of purple clouds outside the windows, existing far off in the distance. Remember these are a kindergartner's "hopes and dreams"; this is what his imagination pictures when it's uncoercively invited to do so. Remember he is but five-years-old.



The US farmer suicide crisis echoes a much larger farmer suicide
crisis happening globally: an Australian farmer dies by suicide every
four days; in the UK, one farmer a week takes his or her own life; in
France, one farmer dies by suicide every two days; in India, more

than 270,000 farmers have died by suicide since 1995.

Since 2013, net farm income for US farmers has declined 50%. Median farm income for 2017 is projected to be negative $1,325. And without
parity in place (essentially a minimum price floor for farm

products), most commodity prices remain below the cost of production.

After the study was released, Newsweek reported that the suicide death rate for farmers was more than double that of military veterans.


[emphasis JS]



Monday, January 08, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1714-1716

The notion that we must better ourselves—or simply survive—by toiling to increase the wealth and property of already wealthy men was perhaps first comprehensively articulated in the 18th-century doctrine of “improvement.” In order to justify privatizing common land and forcing the peasantry into jobbing for them, English landlords attempted to show in treatise after treatise that 1) the peasants were lazy, immoral, and unproductive, and 2) they were better off working for others.
Bertrand Russell & Buckminster Fuller on 
Why We Should Work Less, and Live & Learn More
By Josh Jones / openculture.com



...historian W.E. Tate quotes from several of the “improvement” treatises, many written by Puritans who argued that “the poor are of two classes, the industrious poor who are content to work for their betters, and the idle poor who prefer to work for themselves.” Tate’s summation perfectly articulates the early modern redefinition of “work” as the creation of profit for owners. Such work is virtuous, “industrious,” and leads to contentment. Other kinds of work, leisurely, domestic, pleasurable, subsistence, or otherwise, qualifies—in an Orwellian turn of phrase—as “idleness.”
Bertrand Russell & Buckminster Fuller on Why We Should Work Less, and Live & Learn More
By Josh Jones / openculture.com

[emphasis JS]




As U.S. children’s rights activist Marian Wright Edelman points out, such actions are particularly alarming and cruel at a time when “millions of America’s children today are suffering from hunger, homelessness and hopelessness.”

She adds: “Nearly 13.2 million children are poor — almost one in five. About 70 per cent of them are children of colour, who will be a majority of our children by 2020. More than 1.2 million are homeless. About 14.8 million children struggle against hunger in food insecure households.”

Fascism’s Return and Trump’s War on Youth
Henry Giroux
The Tyee

Monday, January 01, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1711-1713













 



Tuesday, December 26, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1708-1710

It was 2010, and Scott had just graduated from college with a bachelor’s in economics, a minor in business and $30,000 in student debt.
...
After six months of applying and interviewing and never hearing back, Scott returned to his high school job at The Old Spaghetti Factory. After that he bounced around—selling suits at a Nordstrom outlet, cleaning carpets, waiting tables—until he learned that city bus drivers earn $22 an hour and get full benefits. He’s been doing that for a year now. It’s the most money he’s ever made. He still lives at home, chipping in a few hundred bucks every month to help his mom pay the rent.
...
In theory, Scott could apply for banking jobs again. But his degree is almost eight years old and he has no relevant experience. He sometimes considers getting a master’s, but that would mean walking away from his salary and benefits for two years and taking on another five digits of debt—just to snag an entry-level position, at the age of 30, that would pay less than he makes driving a bus.
Why millennials are facing the scariest financial future of any generation since the Great Depression.
By Michael Hobbes
Huffpost

[emphasis JS]




 There is a danger in assuming we know what the earth needs from us. But there is a danger in ceding ground to the powers that run the system that grinds this world to dust in the name of money.

“Sit with it,” the teacher said. It is a common Zen response, and though some see it as a kind of shoulder-shrugging, to me it looks like the opposite. What it really says is: Pay attention. Our culture is hopeless at paying attention. It glorifies action and belittles contemplation.

Paul Kingsnorth
[emphasis JS]

Ms. Lindsley’s experience illustrates the complicated role that human resources departments play in harassment cases. The recent outpouring of complaints from women about mistreatment in the workplace has included numerous accounts of being ignored, stymied or retaliated against by human resources units — accounts that portray them as part of the problem, not the solution.

The lack of trust manifests itself as a self-perpetuating quandary: Women are hesitant to approach human resources departments, and those departments cite the absence of complaints as proof of a respectful workplace.

for some human resource officers, conducting an investigation into harassment allegations against a top executive or star performer can be hazardous to their own careers. The result can often be that human resources personnel are more inclined to suppress allegations than get to the bottom of them.
Sexual Harassment Cases Show the Ineffectiveness of Going to H.R.
By NOAM SCHEIBER and JULIE CRESWELL
DEC. 12, 2017
New York Times 

[emphasis JS] 







Sunday, December 17, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1705-1707

I work in a clinic where the vast majority of my patients are on government-funded health care. I have learned that the stereotypes about these people are true: Most of my patients have never worked a day in their lives.

They are extremely ungrateful for the care that hardworking taxpayers provide for them. Patients have punched me, bitten me, screamed at me, and even urinated on me. I often leave with vomit on my clothes.

Sometimes, I have to bribe my patients with bright-colored objects, juice or graham crackers just to examine them. Do my patients thank me? Do they contribute to the economy? No!

They just suck up low-cost health care, whining the whole time, and then go pick up their free government milk. Often, they are literally carried from place to place in the arms of a real taxpayer.

As a pediatrician, I provide these scowling little freeloaders with life-saving therapies like vaccinations and antibiotics.
...
 Research has shown that people are more likely to die when they lose access to health care. Letting more American children die preventable deaths will send a strong message to kids across the country: Pull your thumbs out of your mouths, get potty-trained and GET A JOB!
As a Doctor, I’m Sick of All The Health Care Freeloaders
Rachel Pearson, M.D., Ph.D
Texas Observer

[thanks to Geneva Hagen]



 I am 35 years old—the oldest millennial, the first millennial—and for a decade now, I’ve been waiting for adulthood to kick in. My rent consumes nearly half my income, I haven’t had a steady job since Pluto was a planet and my savings are dwindling faster than the ice caps the baby boomers melted.
...
Contrary to the cliché, the vast majority of millennials did not go to college, do not work as baristas and cannot lean on their parents for help. Every stereotype of our generation applies only to the tiniest, richest, whitest sliver of young people. And the circumstances we live in are more dire than most people realize.

Why millennials are facing the scariest financial future of any generation since the Great Depression.
By Michael Hobbes
Huffpost

[emphasis JS]


  Nearly a third of American workers now need some kind of state license to do their jobs, compared to less than 5 percent in 1950. In most other developed countries, you don’t need official permission to cut hair or pour drinks. Here, those jobs can require up to $20,000 in schooling and 2,100 hours of instruction and unpaid practice.
Why millennials are facing the scariest financial future of any generation since the Great Depression.
By Michael Hobbes


Monday, December 11, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1702-1704

Kate McFarland: I’ve never found it necessary to structure my life around the pursuit of any career path. The goal merely to make sure that my basic needs are satisfied and otherwise to pursue what interests and engages me at the time. I don’t have an “occupational identity” and don’t feel this as a personal deficiency. There’s a famous passage in The German Ideology in which Marx says, in describing the communist utopia, “nobody has one exclusive sphere of activity” and thus can “do one thing today and another tomorrow, hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, and criticize after dinner, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, shepherd or critic.” That’s almost a perfect expression of the idea.

Of course, given that “career” implies a full-time paid employment rather than just any area of specialization, anti-careerism more specifically–and perhaps even more significantly–rejects the notion that we’re defined and valued by our contributions to the GDP. It also rejects the idea the success is measured by professional promotions and raises.
Interview: Kate McFarland On Anti-Careerism]
December 3, 2017 Jennifer Lawson




…state and local governments are giving out $80 billion a year in tax breaks and other subsidies in a foolhardy, shortsighted race to attract companies. That money could go a long way to improving education, transportation and other public services that would have a far better shot at promoting real economic growth.

Instead, with these giveaways, politicians and officials are trying to pick winners and losers, almost exclusively to the benefit of big corporations (aided by highly paid lobbyists) at the expense of small businesses. Though they promise that the subsidies are smart investments, far too often the jobs either don’t materialize or are short-lived, leaving the communities no better off.
Race to the Bottom
Editorial
New York Times
Published: December 5,
2012 




 Within the technological ensemble, mechanized work in which automatic and semi-automatic reactions fill the larger part (if not the whole) of labor time remains, as a life-long occupation, exhausting, stupefying, inhuman slavery.
Herbert Marcuse











Monday, December 04, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1699-1701

Change is slow and difficult, but there are solutions on the horizon. In The Real Wealth of Nations (2007), Riane Eisler, a social scientist and activist, suggests that social activists should focus on shifting the culture from an archaic domination system inherited from past eras to partnerships towards primary relations between women and men and parents and children.
The Building Blocks of Education
By Libby Simon
PsychCentral



 Solar energy is on the rise in Germany, with a record 1.3 million photovoltaic systems in 2012. The increase comes as new consumer taxes on energy are to take effect in the country.

The recent solar boom means the alternative form of energy now reaches 8 million homes in Germany, a 45 percent increase compared to 2011, the German Solar Industry Association (BSW) said on Tuesday.

"Germany is now reaping the fruits of its efforts in solar technology," said the BSW's chief executive, Carsten Körnig. "Its share of the power supply has quadrupled in just three years. At the same time, the price of a new solar power system installation has halved.
"
Solar energy on the rise in Germany
Date 01.01.2013
Author Dave Raish
DW

[emphasis JS]


 How did they get conned into thinking that they're lucky to have that job, at six or seven dollars an hour, and that their women have to go off and work? I'm talking about men to start with, and that the women have to go off and work, and that the children have to go God knows where -- and so on and so forth. Where did the idea come from that you're "lucky" to have a job? A job without benefits, a job without pension, a job without health care, a job without any permanence whatsoever.
James Hillman
ReVisioning Psychology








Monday, November 27, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1696-1698

At 1,500-plus pages, the Flower Ornament isn’t likely to become a bestseller in the Twitter age. It offers, though, a model of community unlike any other. Nation-states may be dominant in the world as we know it, but the Flower Ornament suggests we take a bigger view. Globalism 1.0—the ancient Mauryan version—probably failed because the world still lacked the communications network it enjoys today. In our day, Globalism 2.0 is falling apart for a different reason. We have the technology but misunderstand what connects us as people: not just our similarities but—even more—our differences.  At 1,500-plus pages, the Flower Ornament isn’t likely to become a bestseller in the Twitter age. It offers, though, a model of community unlike any other. Nation-states may be dominant in the world as we know it, but the Flower Ornament suggests we take a bigger view. Globalism 1.0—the ancient Mauryan version—probably failed because the world still lacked the communications network it enjoys today. In our day, Globalism 2.0 is falling apart for a different reason. We have the technology but misunderstand what connects us as people: not just our similarities but—even more—our differences.
Kurt Spellmeyer, Globalism 3.0
 [emphasis JS]


As if all this is dependent on the archaic compulsion of exchanging our capacity to labour for wages or a salary. Technology should not be deployed to create more bullshit jobs so more people can spend their best years doing meaningless, socially useless tasks. It should be deployed to reduce the working week, to spread the wealth we create, and to make us free from the necessity of waged labour. The future has to be something better than a human being chained to a desk, forever. And it totally can be.
The Basic Income and the Cult of Work
Phil

ALL THAT IS SOLID ...




 LONDON — One need not be a card-carrying revolutionary to deduce that global capitalism has a problem.

In much of the world, angry workers denounce a shortage of jobs paying enough to support middle-class life. Economists puzzle over the fix for persistently weak wage growth, just as robots appear poised to replace millions of human workers. At the annual gathering of the global elite in the Swiss resort of Davos, billionaire finance chieftains debate how to make capitalism kinder to the masses to defuse populism.

Enter the universal basic income.
...
Yet from a political standpoint, basic income appears to have found its moment, one delivered by the anxieties of the working poor combined with those of the wealthy, who see in widening inequality the potential for mobs yielding pitchforks
.

Capitalism Has a Problem. Is Free Money the Answer?

By PETER S. GOODMAN
New York Times
NOV. 15, 2017







 

Monday, November 20, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1693-1695

Philadelphia, by Franklin's time, answered less and less to the religious vision that William Penn had started off with. The city was becoming a kind of high-output machine, materials and labor going in, goods and services coming out, traffic inside flowing briskly about a grid of regular city blocks. The urban mazework of London, leading into ambiguities and indeed evils, was here all rectified, orthogonal. (Dickens, visiting in 1842, remarked, "After walking about in it for an hour or two, I felt that I would have given the world for a crooked street.") Spiritual matters were not quite as immediate as material ones, like productivity. Sloth was no longer so much a sin against God or spiritual good as against a particular sort of time, uniform, one-way, in general not reversible -- that is, against clock time, which got everybody early to bed and early to rise. 
...
BY the time of "Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall-Street" (1853), acedia had lost the last of its religious reverberations and was now an offense against the economy. Right in the heart of robber-baron capitalism, the title character develops what proves to be terminal acedia. It is like one of those western tales where the desperado keeps making choices that only herd him closer to the one disagreeable finale. Bartleby just sits there in an office on Wall Street repeating, "I would prefer not to." While his options go rapidly narrowing, his employer, a man of affairs and substance, is actually brought to question the assumptions of his own life by this miserable scrivener -- this writer! -- who, though among the lowest of the low in the bilges of capitalism, nevertheless refuses to go on interacting anymore with the daily order, thus bringing up the interesting question: who is more guilty of Sloth, a person who collaborates with the root of all evil, accepting things-as-they-are in return for a paycheck and a hassle-free life, or one who does nothing, finally, but persist in sorrow?
The Deadly Sins/Sloth; Nearer, My Couch, to Thee
By THOMAS PYNCHON
New York Times
[emphasis JS]
Thanks to Derek Robinson



Describing almost all of us 20 years ago, Godin writes in The Icarus Deception,
“The unsure employee is putty in the hands of the manager seeking to give directions. When you decide you’re not talented enough or not ready to speak up, when you buy the line about not being well trained or well born enough to make a difference, you cede your power to those in authority.”
Seth is not describing work ethic. He is describing conformity; conformity, in most cases, to a value system of endless hours at the office at the expense of our personal lives. Worst of all, our efforts were not met, in most cases, with a corresponding likelihood of those efforts returning what we were chasing — partnership, a corner office, a huge slug of equity that gets cashed out when the company is sold … In some cases, the effort panned out. In most, it did not.
Millennials Will Work Hard, Just Not for Your Crappy Job
Brett Cenkus
TheStartup




Work time too often bleeds into home time as work loads are impossible to manage as task piles upon task. Or at any time the phone threatens to go with a "request" to come in, shattering your free time and reminding you your time is their largesse. Too many workplaces are permanently short staffed, and the experience of work is a dizzying affair of plate spinning and routine. Life isn't for enjoyment, it's a treadmill for countless millions who realise when they reach retirement that they're too knackered or too ill to do the things they always wished to. Life is far too short to be spent and bent in involuntary servitude, especially when work can be planned and shared out equitably.
The Basic Income and the Cult of Work
Phil
ALL THAT IS SOLID ...