Jack Saturday

Monday, March 30, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1277-1279

Roughly one in 20 UK students has worked in the sex industry to earn money while at university, a new study has found. 
...

In a climate of high tuition fees and increasing living costs, more than half of student sex workers are motivated by the need to pay for basic living costs, while 45 percent wish to avoid debt, the research revealed.
Thousands embrace sex work to fund university costs, study finds
March 27, 2015
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Last year, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 46 percent of recent college graduates were in jobs that don’t even require a college degree.
Robert Reich
Why College Isn’t (and Shouldn’t Have to be) for Everyone
SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 2015






Meanwhile, the jobs of many teachers and university professors will disappear, replaced by online courses and interactive online textbooks.

Where will this end?
Robert Reich,
MONDAY, MARCH 16, 2015








Monday, March 23, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1274-1276

All taxi drivers, not just the owner-drivers of London's famous black cabs, are under threat of extinction from automation - and they are not alone. A recent study by Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne at Oxford University suggests that 47% of all categories of jobs providing employment today could be automated within 20 years.

This research has been widely misreported. Osborne and Frey did not say that 47% of all jobs will be automated but rather that 47% of all categories of jobs may disappear. If you look at the list of categories included at the end of their report it is clear that the total number of jobs under threat is far greater than 47%, simply because many of the categories are large cohorts.

Sweep away the rocket scientists of the world and we would hardly notice the blip. Make all the world's taxi drivers, delivery and distribution drivers, bus drivers, tram drivers, train drivers, street cleaner drivers and garbage truck drivers redundant and you get an unemployment problem that will destroy economies and cause serious, global social problems. There are more than four million people driving trucks, taxis, limos and buses in the USA alone.

Forget the economy: the "future of work" is the key issue in this election
By: The Leader @theleaderspeaks
Published: Monday, March 9, 2015



1800-2000, global population increased 6 times. Over the same period, the total amount of wealth produced increased 49 times…most of this wealth went to a few at the expense of the many.
Power and Powerlessness




Play is the only way the highest intelligence of humankind can unfold. 
Joseph Chilton Pearce








Monday, March 16, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1271-1273

The organization of work and the organization of leisure are the blades of the castrating shears whose job is to improve the race of fawning dogs.
Vaneigem




Rescuing political action from its current paralysis is no different from developing the publicness of the Intellect outside the realm of wage Labor, in opposition to it.
Paolo Virno,
A Grammar of the Multitude




I'm a free soul who hates paying attention to things I am not interested in. Consequently, I have rarely been comfortable in the role of 'employee.'
Steve Solomon

Monday, March 09, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1268-1270

There’s something dangerous happening to millions of Americans nationwide. It is happening in places where many people spend at least 40 hours a week. It is causing severe physical and mental illness. It runs off fear and manipulation. But its victims are not talking it about.

So what is it?

Work abuse.

Look around the average American workplace and it’s not too hard to find. Twenty-seven percent of all adult Americans report experiencing work abuse and an additional 21 percent of Americans report witnessing it, meaning some 65 million Americans have been affected.

“Anything that affects 65 million Americans is an epidemic,” said Gary Namie, co-founder of the Workplace Bullying Institute. “But it’s an un-discussable epidemic because employers don’t want this discussed.”
What To Do About Your Jerk of a Boss Before You Get PTSD
Millions of workers are suffering from anxiety, depression and even PTSD because of bully bosses.
By Alyssa Figueroa / AlterNet March 5, 2015
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The number of people with graduate degrees receiving food assistance or other forms of federal aid nearly tripled between 2007 and 2010, according to the U.S. Census. More specifically, 28 percent of food-stamp households were headed by a person with at least some college education in 2013, compared with 8 percent in 1980, according to an analysis by University of Kentucky economists.

The hypereducated poor, as I've come to think of them, are as hidden to the country at large as Bolin is at Columbia. "Nobody knows or cares that I have a PhD, living in the trailer park," says a former linguistics adjunct and mother of one child, who lives in Eugene, Oregon, and was on welfare and food stamps. A St. Paul, Minnesota, librarian, who admits that few of her friends have any clue how broke she is, puts it this way: "Every American thinks they're a temporarily embarrassed millionaire: I am no exception."
Alissa Quart / AlterNet January 9, 2015
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Uber workers aren’t alone. There are millions like just them, also outside the labor laws — and their ranks are growing. Most aren’t even part of the new Uberized “sharing” economy.

They’re franchisees, consultants, and free lancers.

They’re also construction workers, restaurant workers, truck drivers, office technicians, even workers in hair salons.

What they all have in common is they’re not considered “employees” of the companies they work for. They’re “independent contractors” – which puts all of them outside the labor laws, too.

The rise of “independent contractors” Is the most significant legal trend in the American workforce – contributing directly to low pay, irregular hours, and job insecurity.
...
For example, FedEx calls its drivers independent contractors.

Yet FedEx requires them to pay for the FedEx-branded trucks they drive, as well as the FedEx uniforms they wear, and FedEx scanners they use – along with insurance, fuel, tires, oil changes, meals on the road, maintenance, and workers compensation insurance. If they get sick or need a vacation, they have to hire their own replacements. They’re even required to groom themselves according to FedEx standards.

FedEx doesn’t tell its drivers what hours to work, but it tells them what packages to deliver and organizes their workloads to ensure they work between 9.5 and 11 hours every working day.
Robert Reich: Why Work Has Become a Nightmare and How to Stop It
AlterNet, February 23, 2015
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Monday, March 02, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1265-1267

In 2013, researchers at the Oxford Martin School predicted that in the next two decades 47% of US jobs would be in danger of being lost to automation. McKinsey Global Institute research suggests that 140 million knowledge workers worldwide are at risk of the same fate. Most policymakers do not even want to think about the prospect of mass automation, because it is unlike any change we have seen before.
Paul Mason
theguardian
[emphasis JS]


The arrival of humanoid robots should be a cause for celebration. With the robots doing most of the work, it should be possible for everyone to go on perpetual vacation.
Marshall Brain, Robotic Nation



Leisure consists in all those virtuous activities by which a man [sic] grows morally, intellectually, and spiritually. It is that which makes a life worth living.
Cicero

Monday, February 23, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1262-1264

The things one is paid a salary for doing are never, in my experience, serious; never seem in the long run of any particular use to anyone.
Malcolm Muggeridge




Time is the coin of your life. It is the only coin you have, and only you can determine how it will be spent. Be careful lest you let other people spend it for you.
Carl Sandburg




I think wage slavery is an attack on fundamental human rights.
Noam Chomsky
















Monday, February 16, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1259-1261

Most of us don’t have the freedom to complain much at work. There’s something a touch tyrannical about this condition. Our Protestant work ethic has blended with contemporary notions of self-actualization to create a situation in which we are all expected to whistle like Disney dwarfs.
By PAUL JASKUNAS
FEB. 14, 2015
New York Times




A new report by the Restaurant Opportunities Centers (ROC) United and Forward Together titled “The Glass Floor: Sexual Harassment in the Restaurant Industry” exposes this epidemic.

The report states that women make up 52 percent of the restaurant industry’s 11 million workers. About two-thirds of these female workers are tipped workers, who often earn a sub-minimum wage and rely on customers for the rest of their wages.

The report writes that this creates “an environment in which a majority female workforce must please and curry favor with customers to earn a living. Depending on customers’ tips for wages discourages workers who might otherwise stand up for their rights and report unwanted sexual behaviors.”

The groups spoke to one New York server who explained why workers deal with inappropriate customer behavior.

“There is a lot of sexual harassment [but] you just kind of brush it off,” she said. “I just want my tip, I don’t want anything to mess up my tip.”
'As A Waitress, I Brush Off Sexual Harassment Because I Just Want My Tip’
AlterNet / By Alyssa Figueroa 
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According to the Nova Scotia study, a single mother with three children in the province, earning the minimum wage, will be nearly $500 in the red every month if she were to purchase nutritional food (that’s after paying for other basic living costs such as rent, heat, hydro). A family of four, meanwhile, with two adults working for minimum wage, would face a monthly deficit of $44.89.

The study looked at minimum-wage data from 2002 to 2012, and used the National Nutritious Food Basket, a Health Canada measurement of 67 foods easily found in grocery stores, eaten by most Canadians and considered nutritionally balanced, to cost the food. And it concluded that the “risk of food insecurity is a critical public-health issue for low wage earners.”

The effects of a poor diet are well known. Along with stress and low energy in the short term, poor nutrition over a long time period puts people at risk for obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke, and a myriad other illnesses.
JANE TABER
HALIFAX — Globe and Mail
updated Wednesday, Oct. 22 2014













Monday, February 09, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1256-1258

I haven't been able to save anything for retirement, my son will have to find his own way to college. Vacation? what's that? And "entertainment"? don't make me laugh (though much of what passes as entertainment these days is garbage and I wouldn't spend the money on it even if I had it). Yet I make $36,000.00 per year and thus fall into the middle class bracket. I was unemployed for almost three years and it completely wiped me out. I found employment almost two years ago now but I am still digging out. I'm 53. I'll never retire. Sad thing is, I know a lot of people just like me, just hanging on. The American Dream? It's gone.
Moira
Comments section
Middle Class Shrinks Further as More Fall Out Instead of Climbing Up
By DIONNE SEARCEY and ROBERT GEBELOFF
New York Times
JAN. 25, 2015
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In the United States—as in all of the world’s wealthier nations—ending poverty is not a matter of resources. Many economists, including Timothy Smeeding of the University of Wisconsin (and former director of the Institute for Research on Poverty) have argued that every developed nation has the financial wherewithal to eradicate poverty. In large part this is because post-industrial productivity has reached the point where to suggest a deficit in resources is laughably disingenuous.
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But there may be a solution. Some might see it as radical, but advocates, both libertarian and liberal, are suggesting straight up cash: a guaranteed subsidy to everyone.
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A simple cash subsidy—$15,000 per year (which is about what the average retiree gets annually from Social Security) for every household, say—would give the poor and middle class a financial floor on which they could live, take care of their loved ones and maybe, says Jacobson, "think about what really needs doing, what they would like to do, what they have trained to do, as opposed to simply what someone might hire them to do."

It makes financial sense for the cash-strapped U.S. government.
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In switching over to a universal basic income, the books will not only stay balanced—they might even move into the black. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, there are 115,227,000 households in the U.S. Split $1.88 trillion among all these households and each one gets $16,315.62. In other words, if you turned the welfare system into a $15,000 basic income payment, you’d end up saving over $150 billion (or $1,315.62 per American household).
...
Households making over $100,000 per year probably get by just fine on their own. Cut them out of the equation, and you would end up with a $20,000 basic income check for the remaining households, while still netting the government some nice savings.
BY BETSY ISAACSON
Newsweek
DECEMBER 14, 2014
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The animal works when deprivation is the mainspring of its activity, and it plays when the fullness of its strength is this mainspring, when superabundant life is its own stimulus to activity.
Anthropologist Marshall Sahlins
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Monday, February 02, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1253-1255

...allowing child poverty to remain at these unconscionable levels costs “far more than eliminating it would,” calculating that an immediate 60 percent reduction in child poverty would cost $77.2 billion a year, or just 2 percent of our national budget.

For context, the report puts it this way:

Every year we keep 14.7 million children in poverty costs our nation $500 billion — six times more than the $77 billion investment we propose to reduce child poverty by 60 percent.”

The report cites the M.I.T. Nobel laureate economist and 2014 Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient Dr. Robert Solow, who wrote in his foreword to a 1994 C.D.F. report, “Wasting America’s Future”: “As an economist I believe that good things are worth paying for; and that even if curing children’s poverty were expensive, it would be hard to think of a better use in the world for money.”
Reducing Our Obscene Level of Child Poverty
Charles M. Blow
New York Times
JAN. 28, 2015
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In the late 1960s, more than half of the households in the United States were squarely in the middle, earning, in today’s dollars, $35,000 to $100,000 a year. Few people noticed or cared as the size of that group began to fall, because the shift was primarily caused by more Americans climbing the economic ladder into upper-income brackets.

But since 2000, the middle-class share of households has continued to narrow, the main reason being that more people have fallen to the bottom. 
Middle Class Shrinks Further as More Fall Out Instead of Climbing Up
By DIONNE SEARCEY and ROBERT GEBELOFF
New York Times
JAN. 25, 2015
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The fundamental truth about economics is that the methods and instruments of production, freely used and fairly used, are capable of giving every human being a decent standard of living. The factors which obstruct the free and fair use of the methods and instruments of production are the factors which must disappear before a natural society can be established. Whatever these factors are - an obsolete financial system, the private ownership of property, rent and usury - they are anti-democratic factors, and prevent the establishment of a natural society, and consequently prevent the establishment of a creative civilization.
Herbert Read
To Hell With Culture
1963
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Monday, January 26, 2015

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1250-1252

The United States offers three kinds of subsidies to tycoons with private jets: accelerated tax write-offs, avoidance of personal taxes on the benefit by claiming that private aircraft are for security, and use of air traffic control paid for by chumps flying commercial.

I worry about those tycoons sponging off government. Won’t our pampering damage their character? Won’t they become addicted to the entitlement culture, demanding subsidies even for their yachts? Oh, wait ...
Nicholas Kristof
A Nation of Takers?
MARCH 26, 2014
New York Times
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The disenfranchised, ostracised youth are an easy target for indoctrinators of all sorts. The current economic crisis, which hits the youth particularly hard, has even handed more ammunition to fanatics: among the young men who enlist to fight for Daesh, many are actually disenfranchised white youth with no familial links to Islam.
Charlie Hebdo: a letter to my British friends
Olivier Tonneau
theguardian
[emphasis JS]



Target Canada currently has 133 stores across the country and employs approximately 17,600 people.

"I can't think of another time in Canadian history when 18,000 people were laid off at once; It's a tragedy on several levels," said Unifor economist Jim Stanford. "It's an incredible legacy of scorched earth that Target has left from its misguided venture up here in Canada."

The Minneapolis-based department store entered the Canadian market in 2012, after purchasing 200 former Zellers store locations from the Hudson's Bay Company.

In that $1.8 billion deal, almost 27,000 workers lost their jobs. Shortly afterward, Target announced that all Zellers employees -- regardless of experience or years of service -- would be fired and needed to reapply if they wanted a job in their rebranded workplaces. The new jobs were not unionized, and "new" hires lost their years of seniority, and started their jobs with wages set at the bottom of Target's pay scale.
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...most Target workers won't qualify for Employment Insurance benefits, "because of the bias rules that makes it very hard for part-time or irregular workers to collect enough hours to qualify."
17,600 workers lose as Target Canada closes its operations
BY ELLA BEDARD
JANUARY 15, 2015
rabble.ca
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