Jack Saturday

Monday, February 05, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1726-1728

The more I investigated depression and anxiety, the more I found that, far from being caused by a spontaneously malfunctioning brain, depression and anxiety are mostly being caused by events in our lives. If you find your work meaningless and you feel you have no control over it, you are far more likely to become depressed.
I started to find a whole blast of scientific evidence that depression and anxiety are not caused in our skulls, but by the way many of us are being made to live.
The Real Causes Of Depression Have Been Discovered, And They're Not What You Think
By Johann Hari

[emphasis JS] 

Another Whole Foods supervisor, meanwhile, says that they dread coming to work for fear that someone from the corporate office will be there to brutally evaluate their team’s work.

“I wake up in the middle of the night from nightmares about maps and inventory, and when regional leadership is going to come in and see one thing wrong, and fail the team,” they said. “The stress has created such a tense working environment. Seeing someone cry at work is becoming normal.”
Whole Foods Workers Revolt After Amazon Imposes Dystopian Grading System
By Brad Reed
via Alternet

[emphasis JS] 

Able-bodied is not truly a demographic label, though: There is no standard for physical or mental ability that makes a person able. Rather, the term has long been a political one. Across centuries of use, it has consistently implied another negative: The able-bodied could work, but are not working (or working hard enough). And, as such, they don’t deserve our aid.

“Within that term is this entire history of debates about the poor who can work but refuse to, because they’re lazy,” said Susannah Ottaway, a historian of social welfare at Carleton College in Minnesota. “To a historian, to see this term is to understand its very close association with debates that center around the need to morally reform the poor.”

In Washington, “able-bodied” has retained its moral connotations but lost much of its historical context. The term dates back 400 years, when English lawmakers used it the same way, to separate poor people who were physically incapable of supporting themselves from the poor who ought to be able to. Debates over poverty in America today follow a direct line from that era.

Under Elizabethan poor law, the job of making these distinctions went to church wardens and parish overseers, people who lived in the community.

Who’s Able-Bodied Anyway?
By Emily Badger and Margot Sanger-Katz
Feb. 3, 2018
New York Times 


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